Waste of digital real estate?

Some of you already know that I fancy Pie Charts. Indeed they are a waste of digital real estate, but it somehow brakes the static look and feel of dashboards with just tables and Line Charts. (Looking forward to the new types in SSRS 2016 btw!)

For now, anyone who would like the recreate this one: http://blog.hoegaerden.be/2009/10/25/pie-chart-techniques/

I do fancy Pie Charts















And what do you think about maps? A nice addition or a waste of digital real estate?

Geo Map - SSRS 2012 2014


















Two dashboards I’ve made for my clients, all of them are extremely happy! πŸ™‚
(Both can be made on SSRS 2008R2, 2012 and 2014)

BumbleBI Dashboard example

 

BumbleBI Dashboard - SSRS 2012 2014

 


 


 

SSRS Dashboarding: a ‘webdesign-look’

Couple of weeks ago, I shared my SSRS dashboard with the community on LinkedIn:

SSRS Dashboard shared on LinkedIn














Koos van Strien asked for the source (RDL) and restyled the dashboard with his ‘webdesign-look’. Pretty nice!

SSRS Dashboard response on LinkedIn

















Koos discusses the changes he made to my dashboard on his blog:
http://www.msbiblog.com/2016/01/28/ssrs-non-ugly-5-the-nitty-griddy-details/#more-402

Here are both dashboards in full size:

SSRS Dashboard Clint Huijbers

 

SSRS Dashboard Koos van Strien



 


 


 

SSRS: How to use a date/time parameter as an input for an MDX query (instead of a list of text values)

I guess we’ve all seen it before, VS/SSDT/BIDS automatically generates datasets for input parameters (which is fine to start with).

But for Date/Time parameters it always (by default) selects the ‘Text’-datatype (drop-down list), instead of the ‘Date/Time’-datatype (nice calendar).


What we want to achieve
So this is what we want to achieve (in red):

SSRS datetime input parameter instead of text for mdx





Start a clean slate
First step is to drop the generated date/time parameter(s) we’re not going to use and create a new one:

SSRS datetime input parameter instead of text for mdx - properties






Make sure to select the ‘Date/Time’ as the datatype, which enables the nice calender-type input. Leave the ‘Available Values’-section unchanged/empty.


Hussle the Date-value in the correct format (YYYY-MM-DD)
A difference between both datatypes is that the ‘Date/Time’-datetype will return values formatted based on your local/regional settings (e.g. YYYY-M-D or in my case D-M-YYYY).
Where I need it to be YYYY-MM-DD (including 0’s), so something like:
2015-12-01

To achieve this, we need to cast/convert a little bit and include a ‘0’ when we need it:

=IIF(LEN(CSTR(DATEPART(DateInterval.Month,CDate(Parameters!DateFrom.Value)))) = 2,
CSTR(DATEPART(DateInterval.Month,CDate(Parameters!DateFrom.Value))),
"0"+CSTR(DATEPART(DateInterval.Month,CDate(Parameters!DateFrom.Value)))
)



Turn it into a MDX value
The final step is to get it into the desired value for MDX:
[Dim Creation Date].[Date].&[2015-12-05T00:00:00]

Here’s the full code expression which you can use as a parameter value (expression):

="[Dim Creation Date].[Date].&["
+CSTR(DATEPART(DateInterval.Year,CDate(Parameters!DateFrom.Value)))+"-"+
IIF(LEN(CSTR(DATEPART(DateInterval.Month,CDate(Parameters!DateFrom.Value)))) = 2,
CSTR(DATEPART(DateInterval.Month,CDate(Parameters!DateFrom.Value))),
"0"+CSTR(DATEPART(DateInterval.Month,CDate(Parameters!DateFrom.Value)))
)+"-"+
IIF(LEN(CSTR(DATEPART(DateInterval.Day,CDate(Parameters!DateFrom.Value)))) = 2,
CSTR(DATEPART(DateInterval.Day,CDate(Parameters!DateFrom.Value))),
"0"+CSTR(DATEPART(DateInterval.Day,CDate(Parameters!DateFrom.Value)))
)
+"T00:00:00]"



Use the expression as an input value for your dataset
The final step is to use the expression:

SSRS datetime input parameter instead of text for mdx - dataset properties









Done!
That’s it! Bye bye ugly drop-down list πŸ™‚

SSRS datetime input parameter instead of text for mdx - final result











SSRS Drill-through: passing multiple values to another report (MDX list of values)

When I build large dashboards, I often fall back to basic stored procedures to combine datasets, but also to be able to manipulate parameter values (month, first week, previous week, previous year totals, etc.).
An annoying thing is that when you want to create a drill-though action to another report which uses MDX, you’ll need to magically join these values.

Well…here’s how you could achieve it.
Let’s say I have these three values (keys): XXX, YYY and ZZZ

MDX expects a prefix and a suffix (according to the dimension properties/levels).
So here’s what MDX expects:

[Dim Customer].[Customer Number].&[XXX]
[Dim Customer].[Customer Number].&[YYY]
[Dim Customer].[Customer Number].&[ZZZ]

Important: MDX expects different objects/rows, like you need to use separate rows in VS/SSDT for the default parameter values.

Your dataset returns the basic key values, first step is to join these (including the prefix and suffix):

="[Dim Customer].[Customer Number].&["+JOIN(Parameters!Customer.Value,"], [Dim Customer].[Customer Number].&[")+"]"

The results is:

[Dim Customer].[Customer Number].&[XXX],[Dim Customer].[Customer Number].&[YYY],[Dim Customer].[Customer Number].&[ZZZ]

Which seems correct, but MDX isn’t expecting a multi-valued string (compared to SP’s).

Final thing, you’ll need to do is to split it again in order to provide a record/row per value:

=Split("[Dim Customer].[Customer Number].&["+JOIN(Parameters!Customer.Value,"], [Dim Customer].[Customer Number].&[")+"]",",")








SSRS: Windows Authentication connection to SMTP server

In order to get SSRS to use Windows Authentication to setup a connection with your local SMTP, you’ll need to modify the rsreportserver.config.

The ‘rsreportserver.config’-file is located in: X:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSRS1111.MSSQLSERVER\Reporting Services\ReportServer

Open the file and look for ‘SMTPAuthenticate‘:

SSRS SMTP configuration





















By default it is empty, but you’ll need to set it to ‘2‘.

More info about this property: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms159155(v=sql.120).aspx#bkmk_options_local_SMTP

SMTPAuthenticate specifies how the report server connects to the remote SMTP server. The default value is 0 (or no authentication). In this case, the connection is made through Anonymous access. Depending on your domain configuration, the report server and the SMTP server may need to be members of the same domain.
To send e-mail to restricted distribution lists (for example, distribution lists that accept incoming messages only from authenticated accounts), set SMTPAuthenticate to 2.

IMPORTANT: After you’ve saved the configuration-file, don’t forget to restart the SSRS service on your server.








SSRS: NaN, Infinity or even #Error

I’ve seen many IIF’s, CASE-statements, +0.00001 additions and others to suppress or solve one of these ‘errors’:
NaN, Infinity or even #Error

Let’s start with the basics, when do these things emerge and why?
Normally, you get NaN when trying to divide 0 / 0 or Infinity when you are dividing any number by 0.

I personally use this function to overcome such obstacles:
Public Function Divide(ByVal dividend As Double, ByVal divisor As Double) As Double
If IsNothing(divisor) Or divisor = 0 Or IsNothing(dividend) Or dividend = 0 Then
Return 0
Else
Return dividend / divisor
End If
End Function

And here’s how you should use it:
=Code.Divide(X,Y)

Other more creative solutions are:
=REPLACE(X/Y,"NaN","0")
Or:
=IIF(Y = 0, 0, X/Y)
Or:
=Switch(
X/Y = "NaN",Nothing,
X/Y = "Infinity",Nothing,
X/Y = "Infinity",Nothing
)

SOLVED: β€œThe size necessary to buffer the XML content exceeded the buffer quota” (SSRS)

ssrs-xml-buffer-overflow-error





OMG…I hate this one.
Most of the times when you’re using textbox references (like: ‘Reportitems!Textbox33.Value‘) and when I think you press ‘Delete’ on certain cells, VS automatically renews the textbox-numbers. So things get messed up.

ssrs-xml-buffer-overflow-error-non-existing-textbox-items





So…check if any of your report items are referencing non-existing textbox items, non-existing paramters or fields that are not in existing dataset scope.

Funny thing is that when you start deleting other report items (of which you think they work properly), VS somehow makes up his mind by giving you a decent error message:

ssrs-xml-buffer-overflow-error-which-explains











Data driven subscriptions cannot be created because the credentials used to run the report are not stored,the report is using user-defined parameters values, or if a linked report, the link is no longer valid.

Well SSRS is stil bugging you huh?

ssrs-data-driven-subscription-cannot-be-created-user-defined-parameter-values

There are a few things you may need to check:

1) Make sure that you’ve stored the credentials of the data source IN the report

2) Since the data-driven subscription is running without an actual user-context, the use of User!UserID is not allowed.

Start by adding this custom code to your report (under ‘Report Properties‘ -> ‘Code‘):

Public Function UserName()
Try
Return Report.User!UserID
Catch
Return "System"
End Try
End Function

Now you need the find: User!UserID

And replace it by: code.UserName()

in the Code-view of the report.








Copy/Pasting elements in SSRS…argh!

Report-builder-was-unable-to-paste-successfully

Report Builder was unable to paste successfully.

Hmmm….that one buggers me.
Turns out that it doesn’t like have custom code in elements which you would like to copy/paste.
It’s a known issue for years and has been reported, but they decided not to fix it…
https://connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/feedback/details/767968/visual-studio-2008-unable-to-copy-and-paste-textboxes-in-ssrs-reports-with-custom-code-after-2008-r2-sp2-upgrade

So what’s the work-around you might ask? Well…you’ll need to comment out all the ‘Code.’-sections in the XML code of the report.

Workaround:

Step 1) Open up the XML view for the report, either in Visual Studio by right clicking the report and selecting View Code, or by editing in any text editor.
Comment out Code. blocks. Ctrl + F your way through the document looking for Code.. The goal is to preserve the code in some way, while temporarily commenting out the line. Depending on your actual code, this might be different, but I here’s what I like to do:

Step 2)
Find: =Code.
Replace With: =’Code.

Step 3) Go back to the Designer View and Copy and Paste the Tablix. You can do this by right clicking the top left corner of the tablix control: Copy Tablix

Step 4) Go back to the XML View and reverse the find and replace
Find: =’Code.
Replace With: =Code.



Visual Basic code
Another things it that is has a habit of putting Visual Basic code in front of your SSRS expression, like for example:

Microsoft.VisualBasic.Information.
Microsoft.VisualBasic.Interaction.
Microsoft.VisualBasic.Strings.
Microsoft.ReportingServices.RdlObjectModel.ExpressionParser.VBFunctions.

When you copy/paste anything, afterwards view the XML code and just replace remove these strings with Find&Replace.



ReportItems!Textbox.Value
In case your using ReportItems!Textbox.Value, make sure to check a few that Visual Studio ‘changed’ the number accordingly. Don’t know why, but most of the time it does understand the logic and also adjusts the textbox-numbers accordingly. But sometimes it doesn’t πŸ™‚








SSRS: SQL Agent Job Schedule Timeline report

Inspired by the SQLjobvis application, which works great btw.
But I wanted to make it a little neater and (of course) have the ability to schedule it daily πŸ˜‰

Thus….here’s the result:

sql-agent-job-schedule-timeline-report

It displays the SQL Agent Job History of the past 24-hours, but you might want to increase that or even use Dynamic-SQL with Linked-Servers to have the option to select different SQL Servers.

Important note:
In the query I’ve used the new TRY_CONVERT function of SQL Server 2012 (more info here). In case you want to use this report on 2005 or 2008 (R2), look for the function in the query and remove that part (prefix string for report subscriptions).
You may want to use the attached stored procedure or stick with the report which has the query built-in.
Also in the ZIP-file you find a SQL query that is compatible with SQL Server 2000 (but is of course a bit slower).

If you like the report, show your appreciation by sharing it on your blog or social media.
Have fun with it!

Download:
Download it here


Here’s another report of mine which you might find interesting:
SSRS: SQL Agent Job Status report

sql-agent-jobs-report