Power BI (Office 365) pricing has been announced

Many thanks to SQL Chick (Melissa Coates) for the news!

The features you have end up being the same (more on that below). The differences shown below are only related to what prerequisites you already have in order to determine pricing.

Power-BI-Pricing-without-E3-E4

Pricing for the E3/E4 plans is shown in the next screen shot. The importance of E3/E4 is that they come with Office 2013 Professional Plus and SharePoint Online (SPO) Plan 2 – both of which are important prerequisites for Power BI features and functionality.

Office-365-E3-E4-Pricing

Let’s say you are an E3 subscriber at $20/month. Add the $20/month special offer price for Power BI and it’s a total of $40/month per user. That’s much better pricing than the $52 shown in the far right hand column of the pricing chart. Hmmm…sounds like a price break to entice more customers to the Enterprise Office 365 plans.

Good tip! 🙂



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Power BI for Office 365

Power BI for Office 365 is a cloud-based business intelligence (BI) solution that enables our customers to easily gain insights from their data, working within Excel to analyze and visualize the data in a self-service way.

People love Excel for analyzing data, so we’ve built Power BI for Office 365 right into this experience, making it an even more powerful tool. You may have already seen the Power Pivot and Power View capabilities in Excel and today we continue to extend our BI offerings. Power BI for Office 365 now includes:
Power Query, enabling customers to easily search and access public data and their organization’s data, all within Excel (formerly known as “Data Explorer“).
Power Map, a 3D data visualization tool for mapping, exploring and interacting with geographic and temporal data (formerly known as product codename “Geoflow“).
Power Pivot for creating and customizing flexible data models within Excel.
Power View for creating interactive charts, graphs and other visual representations of data.

Power-BI-for-Office-365-Tablet

We know that it’s not only essential for people to have the ability to easily identify new insights from their data, but also to collaborate and provide access to that data in a trusted environment. That’s why Power BI for Office 365 extends beyond your existing on premise systems to deliver value within an already trusted service, providing:

Power BI sites, dedicated collaborative BI workspaces in Office 365 for sharing data and insights with colleagues. The Power BI sites also keep customers’ data up to date with connectivity and data refresh back to their on premise data sources.
New natural language query capabilities that allow customers to ask questions and get answers. They simply type their question into a dialog box and the system interprets and automatically generates interactive charts and graphs based on available data.
Connected BI experience, dedicated native apps for Windows 8, Windows RT and iPad to stay connected with your reports and data wherever you are as well as HTML5 support for browser based viewing on any device.

Nice huh? Don’t forget:

Power Map (formally known as ‘Geoflow’)

Power-BI-for-Office-365-Power-Map-Geoflow

Power View in SharePoint

Power-BI-for-Office-365-Power-View

Microsoft Power BI for Windows or Microsoft Power BI for iPad

Power-BI-for-Windows

Want to signup for the preview this summer?

Power-BI-for-Office-365-Signup-Preview

Thanks to Chris Webb:
http://cwebbbi.wordpress.com/2013/07/08/some-thoughts-about-power-bi/

More info about Microsoft Power BI?:
http://blogs.office.com/b/office-news/archive/2013/07/08/announcing-power-bi-for-office-365.aspx
http://blogs.office.com/b/office365tech/archive/2013/07/07/what-powers-power-bi-in-office-365.aspx
http://blogs.technet.com/b/dataplatforminsider/archive/2013/07/08/introducing-power-bi-for-office-365.aspx
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/excel/power-bi-FX104080667.aspx
http://blogs.msdn.com/b/powerbi/archive/2013/07/07/getting-started-with-pq-and-pm.aspx



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How to setup a SharePoint 2013 – BI Environment

Thanks to Rob Kerr and Kasper de Jonge:

SP2013 Deployment Crash Course
Rob Kerr just posted a fabulous 23-lesson video series deploying a full-up SharePoint 2013 BI environment from soup-to-nuts (SSRS-Integration, PowerPivot, PowerView, Kerberos Delegation, Excel Services, PerformancePoint, etc.).
Go watch it here: http://msbiacademy.com/?cat=451

SharePoint-2013-BI-Environment


Interactive PowerPivot Dashboard (custom map visualization)

I’ve found this great example of an interactive PowerPivot worksheet by Robert Mundigl about the beer prices at Munich’s Oktoberfest.

PowerPivot-interactive-map-layout

How it works?
Actually it’s about the same technic as Kay Unkroth used earlier in one of my previous posts.
Well…here’s how Robert did it!:

PowerPivot-interactive-map-how-it-works

Have a look at Robert Mundigl‘s blogpost and his tutorial: Click here.

The example is also downloadable via this URL.



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Slowly Changing Dimensions (Type 6) the basics

Preserving historical data in a Data Warehouse (DWH – Business Intelligence)
Slowly Changing Dimensions (Type 6)

For business users or data analysts that directly access data marts in Excel or directly from the database/cube, it can be hard to understand how Slowly Changing Dimensions (SCDs) work.
To make things easier, I wrote this small ‘whitepaper’ about the In’s and Out’s of Slowly Changing Dimensions.

Let me know if I’ve missed anything 🙂

Preserving historical data in a Data Warehouse

PowerPivot Memory error: Allocation failure

Did you receive this error message from PowerPivot?

Memory error: Allocation failure : Not enough storage is available to process this command. .
The operation has been cancelled.

PowerPivot-32bits-memory-error-allocation-failure-full

PowerPivot-32bits-memory-error-allocation-failure

Well…you’re probably using PowerPivot’s 32-bits version, more info: InstallPowerPivot.com

“The PowerPivot add-in runs as an extension of Excel and the PowerPivot Vertipaq in-memory engine loads within the same process space. As 32-bit Excel is limited to a 2GB virtual address space. Once you start adding up all of the uses of those virtual addresses, you will find that the largest PowerPivot workbook that you can create on a 32-bit machine is something like 500-700MB. Excel, all of the add-ins, the in-memory database itself and all of the rest just takes up lots and lots of space.” by Dave Wickert

Open Task Manager and locate Excel:

Excel-32bits-task-manager

In my case, it’s not causing any problems since I’m not near the 500 to 700 MB of memory usage.

What shall I do?
– Close all other PowerPivot workbooks which are active (if there are any)
– Reduce the imported datasets/tables by applying filters (in the Table Import Wizard)
– Close Excel (and all PowerPivot workbooks) to clear the memory and re-open that particular PowerPivot workbook
– Install the 64-bits version of PowerPivot (also requires a 64-bits version of Microsoft Excel), more info: InstallPowerPivot.com


PowerPivot Bing Maps look-a-like

I recently found this blogpost on how to create a Bing Maps look-a-like in PowerPivot and it’s actually quite easy.
Here’s how it looks like in PowerPivot:

PowerPivot-Map-Example

It’s an transparent image that lies on top of the cells in Excel:

PowerPivot-Map-Image

And here’s how it looks like once it’s deployed to SharePoint:

PowerPivot-Map-SharePoint

Want to know how he did this?
Well have a look at the blogpost, click here!



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