Windows Azure Reporting now available!

News from MSDN Blogs! (URL)

Today, we are ushering in the new era of Hybrid Cloud, bringing together the best of on-premises and cloud computing. Virtual Machines, Virtual Network, and Web Sites are now available as new preview services for Windows Azure. SQL Reporting is now Generally Available to customers, a locally redundant storage option has been added to provide additional customer choice, and several enhancements to existing Windows Azure services are now live. These updates help customers build and bring their applications to the cloud in their own unique way.

Additionally, a number of pricing and metering updates have been made to increase overall value. These changes include graduated pricing for Network, CDN and Storage; preview pricing for Windows Server and Non-Windows VMs; and a 90% reduction in Storage and CDN transaction prices.

With SQL Reporting on Azure, developers can use familiar tools such as the Business Intelligence Development Studio and SQL Server Data Tools to author reports, just as they do today when running SQL Server Reporting services on-premises. SQL Reporting on Azure provides consistent APIs to view, execute and manage reports along with rich formatting and data visualization options.

Report Formats
With SQL Reporting, you have the ability to export reports to various popular file formats including Excel, Word, HTML, PDF, XML, and CSV.

Pricing (more info here):

You can try this great service free of charge for billing periods beginning prior to August 1, 2012. Thereafter, the charge will be $0.88 per hour per reporting instance.

Well…If you’re interested, I’ll only charge you $0.60 per hour if you want to run your reports on a SSRS Instance all features supported! SQL Database (2008R2 / 2012) on a shared SQL Hotel is also possible, hosted in EasyNet‘s datacenter in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Contact me for more info.

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SQL Azure Billing Numbers Directly From Transact-SQL

Thanks to Karlo Bartels‘s comment on my previous post, here a detailed blogpost on Microsoft.com about the SQL Azure billing numbers/costs with the use of Dynamic Managed Views.

SQL Azure exposes two Dynamic Managed Views called sys.database_usage and sys.bandwidth_usage that show you the activity for your account. These can queried to understand your account usage from a billing perspective.

Database storage costs:

Bandwidth costs:

Download the code right here.

Thanks to Wayne Walter Berry and his post.

Playing around with SQL Azure

I’ve started playing with SQL Azure on my ’30 days free SQL Azure trial’ and already got a few tips:

Login on SQL Azure’s Developer Portal and create a database.

Don’t forget to modify your Firewall settings of SQL Azure in order to connect to it (Tutorial):
A simple statement does the trick (execute on Master DB):

exec sp_set_firewall_rule N'Allow Project Houston','0.0.0.0','0.0.0.0'

An overview of security in SQL Azure

Project ‘Houston’ is very handy! 🙂

I’ve uploaded AdventureWorksDW2008R2 partially (28,2 MB) with Create-scripts and a small SSIS package:

An overview of my tables within SQL Azure:

I can’t find any traffic stats though.

Next on my to-do-list:
Start using SQL Azure within a PowerPivot workbook (performance check).

I’ll keep you guys posted!